How to Shop for a Used Laptop or Desktop PC

During this time of uncertainty, it’s incredibly difficult to locate a budget-friendly desktop PC or laptop with a panel that’s neat and clean to look at, a trackpad and keyboard that are smooth to use, and sufficient performance that won’t leave you waiting for tabs and applications to open. Amid the economic recession due to the global pandemic, a rush of people purchasing PCs and laptops for work and school have made the task a difficult nut to crack.

One solution? A used laptop or desktop PC.

Purchasing a decent used desktop PC demands a little more work than buying something brand-new, but you need to make sure that a desktop or laptop from a few years ago must be adequate for you to edit and create documents/school projects, hop on video or audio calls, navigate through the internet, and communicate with friends and teachers. At Home Tech Rescue, we have a wide range of used PCs and laptops, helping you in negating the riskier websites.

It doesn’t matter whether you’re still adapting to working from home or preparing for yet another semester of remote schooling; opting for a used computer could be an economical way to purchase a well-equipped computer.

Why you should buy a used Laptop or Desktop PC

In buying a used laptop or a desktop PC, you potentially stand a chance to save hundreds of dollars on a computer that possesses the ability to perform everything a brand-new computer can. For the things that people mostly do on their laptops or PCs – editing spreadsheets, documents, pictures, videos, and browsing the web – a used or a brand-new computer don’t tend to perform any different from one another.

What to look for

The 3 most crucial things to look for in a used computer are its specifications, model and make number, and physical condition (particularly for laptops, which bear more punishment by moving here and there constantly).

Few used-PC or laptop sellers post authentic pictures of the computers they’re willing to sell, which makes it incredibly convenient for you to evaluate a computer’s condition. However, some sellers might assign it a letter grade—always go for systems with an A or B rating to diminish the risk of visible damage. The only way to ensure you will buy something that seems new is to purchase a refurbished system.

Our experts suggest sticking to laptops and desktops manufactured by Lenovo, HP, or Dell (or Apple, in case you’re interested in purchasing a Mac).

It is completely fine to purchase used computers made by lesser-known companies like Asus or Acer, but it is usually easier to find supports and parts for older computers made by the more prominent manufacturing companies. Go for business laptops and desktop PCs such as those in the HP Pro and Elite series, the Lenovo ThinkPad and ThinkCentre family, or the Dell Optiplex and Latitude series. Computers of these series are more comfortable to repair and upgrade, and since they’re made out of robust materials, they are more likely to hold up under stress.